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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Arabian Art of Taming and Training Wild
and Vicious Horses, by P. R. Kincaid
John J. Stutzman

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: The Arabian Art of Taming and Training Wild and Vicious Horses

Release Date: January 24, 2005 [EBook #14776]

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK TAMING HORSES ***

Produced by Kentuckiana Digital Library, David Garcia, Michael
Ciesielski and the PG Online Distributed Proofreading Team.

THE ARABIAN ART OF
TAMING AND TRAINING WILD & VICIOUS HORSES.
BY
T. GILBERT, BRO. RAMSEY & CO.
PRINTED AND SOLD FOR THE PUBLISHER BY
HENRY WATKINS
PRINTER, 225 & 227 WEST FIFTH STREET, CINCINNATI, OHIO
1856.


THE HORSEMAN'S GUIDE

AND

FARRIER.


BY JOHN J. STUTZMAN, WEST RUSHVILLE, FAIRFIELD COUNTY, OHIO.


I will here insert some of the most efficient cures of diseases to which
the horse is subject. I have practised them for many years with
unparalleled success. I have cured horses with the following remedies,
which, (in many cases,) have been given up in despair, and I never had a
case in which I did not effect a cure.


CURE FOR COLIC.

Take 1 gill of turpentine, 1 gill of opium dissolved in whisky; 1 quart of
water, milk warm. Drench the horse and move him about slowly. If there is
no relief in fifteen minutes, take a piece of chalk, about the size of an
egg, powder it, and put it into a pint of cider vinegar, which should be
blood warm, give that, and then move him as before.

ANOTHER.--Take 1 ounce laudanum, 1 ounce of ether, 1 ounce of tincture of
assafoetida, 2 ounces tincture of peppermint, half pint of whisky; put all
in a quart bottle, shake it well and drench the horse.


CURE FOR THE BOTS.

Take 1-1/2 pint of fresh milk, (just from the cow,) 1 pint of molasses.
Drench the horse and bleed him in the mouth; then give him 1 pint of
linseed oil to remove them.


FOR DISTEMPER.

Take mustard seed ground fine, tar and rye chop, make pills about the size
of a hen's egg. Give him six pills every six hours, until they physic him;
then give him one table spoonful of the horse powder mentioned before,
once a day, until cured. Keep him from cold water for six hours after
using the powder.


LONG FEVER.

In the first place bleed the horse severely. Give him spirits of nitre,
in water which should not be too cold, for it would chill him. Keep him
well covered with blankets, and rub his legs and body well; blister him
around the chest with mustard seed, and be sure to give him no cold water,
unless there is spirits of nitre in it.


RHEUMATIC LINIMENT.

Take croton oil, aqua ammonia, f.f.f; oil of cajuput, oil of origanum, in
equal parts. Rub well. It is good for spinal diseases and weak back.


CUTS AND WOUNDS OF ALL KINDS.

One pint of alcohol, half ounce of gum of myrrh, half ounce aloes, wash
once a day.


SPRAINS AND SWELLINGS.

Take 1-1/2 ounces of harts-horn, 1 ounce camphor, 2 ounces spirits of
turpentine, 4 ounces sweet oil, 8 ounces alcohol. Anoint twice a day.


FOR GLANDERS.

Take of burnt buck's horn a table spoonful, every three days for nine
days. If there is no relief in that time, continue the powder until there
is relief.


SADDLE OR COLLAR LINIMENT.

One ounce of spirits of turpentine, half ounce of oil of spike, half ounce
essence of wormwood, half ounce castile soap, half ounce gum camphor, half
ounce sulphuric ether, half pint alcohol, and wash freely.


LINIMENT TO SET THE STIFLE JOINT ON A HORSE.

One ounce oil of spike, half ounce origanum, half ounce oil amber. Shake
it well and rub the joints twice a day until cured, which will be in two
or three days.


EYE WATER.

I have tried the following and found it an efficient remedy. I have tried
it on my own eyes and those of others. Take bolus muna 1 ounce, white
vitrol 1 ounce, alum half ounce, with one pint clear rain water: shake it
well before using. If too strong, weaken it with rain water.


LINIMENT FOR WINDGALLS, STRAINS AND GROWTH OF LUMPS ON MAN OR HORSE.

One ounce oil of spike, half ounce origanum, half ounce amber, aqua fortis
and sal amoniac 1 drachm, spirits of salts 1 drachm oil of sassafras half
ounce, harts-horn half ounce. Bathe once or twice a day.


HORSE POWDER.

This powder will cure more diseases than any other medicine known; such as
Distemper, Fersey, Hidebound, Colds, and all lingering diseases which may
arise from impurity of the blood or lungs.--Take 1 lb. comfrey root, half
lb. antimony, half lb. sulphur, 3 oz. of saltpetre, half lb. laurel
berries, half lb. juniper berries, half lb. angetice seed, half lb. rosin,
3 oz. alum, half lb. copperas, half lb. master wort, half lb. gun powder.
Mix all to a powder and give in the most cases, one table spoonful in mash
feed once a day till cured. Keep the horse dry, and keep him from the cold
water six hours after using it.


FOR CUTS OR WOUNDS ON HORSE OR MAN.

Take fishworms mashed up with old bacon oil, and tie on the wound, which
is the surest and safest cure.


OIL FOR COLLARS.

This oil will also cure bruises, sores, swellings, strains or galls. Take
fishworms and put them in a crock or other vessel 24 hours, till they
become clean; then put them in a bottle and throw plenty of salt upon
them, place them near a stove and they will turn to oil; rub the parts
affected freely. I have cured knee-sprung horses with this oil frequently.


SORE AND SCUMMED EYES ON HORSES.

Take fresh butter or rabbit's fat, honey, and the white of three eggs,
well stirred up with salt, and black pepper ground to a fine powder; mix
it well and apply to the eye with a feather. Also rub above the eye (in
the hollow,) with the salve. Wash freely with cold spring water.


FOR A BRUISED EYE.

Take rabbit's fat, and use as above directed. Bathe freely with fresh
spring water. I have cured many bloodshot eyes with this simple remedy.


POLL-EVIL OR FISTULA.

Take of Spanish flies 1 oz., gum euphorbium 3 drachms, tartar emetic 1
oz., rosin 3 oz.; mix and pulverize, and then mix them with a half lb. of
lard. Anoint every three days for three weeks; grease the parts affected
with lard every four days. Wash with soap and water before using the
salve. In poll-evil, if open, pulverize black bottle glass, put as much in
each ear as will lay on a dime. The above is recommended in outside
callous, such as spavin, ringbone, curbs, windgalls, etc. etc.


FOR THE FERSEY.

Take 1 quart of sassafras root bark, 1 quart burdock root, spice wood
broke fine, 1 pint rattle weed root. Boil in 1-1/2 gallons of water; scald
bran; when cool give it to the horse once a day for 3 or 4 days. Then
bleed him in the neck and give him the horse powder as directed. In
extreme cases, I also rowel in the breast and hind legs, to extract the
corruption and remove the swelling. This is also an efficient remedy for
blood diseases, etc., etc.


TO MAKE THE HAIR GROW ON MAN OR BEAST.

Take milk of sulphur 1/2 drachm, sugar of lead 1/2 drachm, rose water 1/2
gill, mix and bathe well twice a day for ten days.


CHOLERA OR DIARRHEA TINCTURE.

1 oz. of laudanum, 1 oz. of spirits of camphor, 1 oz. spirits of nitre,
1/2 oz. essence of peppermint, 20 drops of chloroform; put all in a
bottle, shake well, and take 1/2 teaspoonful in cold water once every six,
twelve and twenty-four hours, according to the nature of the case.


CURE FOR THE HEAVES.

Give 30 grains of tartar emetic every week until cured.


PROCESS OF CAUSING A HORSE TO LAY DOWN.

Approach him gently upon the left side, fasten a strap around the ancle of
his fore-foot; then raise the foot gently, so as to bring the knee against
the breast and the foot against the belly. The leg being in this position,
fasten the strap around his arm, which will effectually prevent him from
putting that foot to the ground again. Then fasten a strap around the
opposite leg, and bring it over his shoulder, on the left side, so that
you can catch hold of it; then push these gently, and when he goes to
fall, pull the strap, which will bring him on his knees.

Now commence patting him under the belly; by continuing your gentle
strokes upon the belly, you will, in a few minutes, bring him to his knees
behind. Continue the process, and he will lie entirely down, and submit
himself wholly to your treatment. By thus proceeding gently, you may
handle his feet and legs in any way you choose.

However wild and fractious a horse may be naturally, after practicing this
process a few times, you will find him perfectly gentle and submissive,
and even disposed to follow you anywhere, and unwilling to leave you on
any occasion.

Unless the horse be wild, the first treatment will be all sufficient; but
should he be too fractious to be approached in a manner necessary to
perform the first named operation, this you will find effectual, and you
may then train your horse to harness or anything else with the utmost
ease.

In breaking horses for harness, after giving the powders, put the harness
on gently, without startling him, and pat him gently, then fasten _the
chain_ to a log, which he will draw for an indefinite length of time. When
you find him sufficiently gentle, place him to a wagon or other vehicle.

NOTE.--Be _extremely_ careful in catching a horse, not to affright him.
After he is caught, and the powders given, rub him gently on the head,
neck, back and legs, and on each side of the eyes, the way the hair lies,
but be very careful not to whip, for a young horse is equally passionate
with yourself, and this pernicious practice has ruined many fine and
valuable horses. When you are riding a colt (or even an old horse), do not
whip him if he scares, but draw the bridle, so that his eye may rest upon
the object which has affrighted him, and pat him upon the neck as you
approach it; by this means you will pacify him, and render him less liable
to start in future.


MEANS OF LEARNING A HORSE TO PACE.

Buckle a four pound weight around the ancles of his hind legs, (lead is
preferable) ride your horse briskly with those weights upon his ancles, at
the same time, twitching each rein of the bridle alternately, by this
means you will immediately throw him into a pace. After you have trained
him in this way to some extent, change your leaded weights for something
lighter; leather padding, or something equal to it, will answer the
purpose; let him wear these light weights until he is perfectly trained.
This process will make a smooth and easy pacer of any horse.


HORSEMANSHIP.

The rider should, in the first place, let the horse know that he is not
afraid of him. Before mounting a horse, take the rein into the left hand,
draw it tightly, put the left foot in the stirrup, and raise quickly. When
you are seated press your knees to the saddle, let your leg, from the
knee, stand out; turn your toe in and heel out; sit upright in your
saddle, throw your weight forward--one third of it in the stirrups--and
hold your rein tight. Should your horse scare, you are braced in your
saddle and he cannot throw you.


INDICATION OF A HORSE'S DISPOSITION.

A long, thin neck indicates a good disposition, contrariwise, if it be
short and thick. A broad forehead, high between the ears, indicates a very
vicious disposition.


CURES, &C.

_Cure for the Founder._--Let 1-1/2 gallons of blood from the neck vein,
make frequent applications of hot water to his forelegs; after which,
bathe them in wet cloths, then give one quart Linseed Oil. The horse will
be ready for service the next day.

_Botts._--Mix one pint honey with one quart sweet milk, give as a drench,
one hour after, dissolve 1 oz. pulverized Coperas in a pint of water, use
likewise, then give one quart of Linseed Oil. Cure effectual.

_Colic._--After bleeding copiously in the mouth, take a half pound of raw
cotton, wrap it around a coal of fire in such a way as to exclude the air;
when it begins to smoke, hold it under the horse's nose until he becomes
easy. Cure certain in ten minutes.

_Distemper._--Take 1-1/2 gallons blood from the neck vein, then give a
dose of Sassafras Oil, 1-1/2 ounces is sufficient. Cure speedy and
certain.

_Fistula._--When it makes its appearance, rowel both sides of the
shoulder; if it should break, take one ounce of verdigris, 1 ounce oil
rosin, 1 ounce copperas, pulverize and mix together. Use it as a salve.


RECEIPT FOR BONE SPAVIN OR RING-BONE.

Take a table-spoonful of corrosive sublimate; quicksilver about the size
of a bean; 3 or 4 drops of muriatic acid; iodine about the size of a pea,
and lard enough to form a paste; grind the iodine and sublimate fine as
flour, and put altogether in a cup, mix well, then shear the hair all off
the size you want; wash clean with soap-suds, rub dry, then apply the
medicine. Let it stay on five days; if it does not take effect, take it
off, mix it over with a little more lard, and add some fresh medicine.
When the lump comes out, wash it clean in soap-suds, then apply a poultice
of cow dung, leave it on twelve hours, then apply healing medicine.


TEMPERANCE BEVERAGE.

One quart of water, three pounds of sugar, one teaspoonful of lemon oil,
one table-spoonful of flour, with the white of four eggs, well beat up.
Mix the above well together, then divide the syrup, and add four ounces of
carbonic soda in one-half, and three ounces of tartaric acid in the other
half; then bottle for use.


SARSAPARILLA SYRUP.

One ounce Sarsaparilla, two pounds brown sugar, ten drops wintergreen, and
half pint of water.

 

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